Wednesday, September 15, 2010

Yes, but . . . .

Will I watch Terriers again this week? Yes, but only to see if it improves. I liked the actors, but the show pulled out nearly every private-eye cliché you can think of. To wit:

1. The down-and-out unlicensed p. i. who's a recovering alcoholic. Oh, yeah, and he's divorced but still loves his ex.

2. The old friend who might as well have been wearing and "I'm going to be murdered" T-shirt.

3. "You might be an addled druggie, and bad men might be trying to kill you, but you are the daughter of my old friend, so I will save and protect you.

4. The rich and powerful and evil California real estate developer.

5. "You might be a rich and powerful and evil California real estate developer, but you had my old friend killed, so I will destroy you."

6. And probably others I've already forgotten.

Maybe the second show will turn all this stuff on its head. We'll see.

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

I think that pretty much says it all.

If not for Donal Logue's performance I would not even give it a second chance.

I must admit I cringed when he gave the "I'm going to destroy you" speech.

It was embarrassing even to listen to that.

Jeff

Bill Crider said...

It really was. I'm afraid I was rolling my eyes.

Harry Hunsicker said...

Yes, I agree with all those points. But it was still a good debut if only for the chemistry between the two leads and the crisp dialogue. The main problem I had with the show was the title.

Terriers?

Because they chew on stuff and won't let go? Because they live like dogs?

Bill Crider said...

Yeah, I liked the leads, too. And I'm still puzzled by that title. There must be a good reason for it, but I don't get it.

Richard R. said...

Gotta love those rich powerful Californians, eh? I used to be one of those, but some alcoholic unlicensed P.I. destroyed me. Darn! Now I'm just an old fat book collector and blogger guy.

Steve Oerkfitz said...

They left out the old army buddy who needs help. Magnum P.I. used that one at least once a season.